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Letters to a Young Manager


Michelangelo II, #330
LTYM > Mission and Vision



Dear Adam,
***
Sometimes it is the artist who sees around the corner and connects the dots for us. As such, perhaps the artist is the penultimate strategist. For the artist, imagination is key, it is the seeking-seeing or the zehnsucht.

When I retired from the NetHope Board, I told this story at the awards dinner:

Last year we visited Florence and toured the Academia Museum. This is where the famous David sculpture is displayed, which Michelangelo carved early in his artistic career. Not many realize that half of his work came after he turned forty. Four examples were intended for the tomb of Pope Julius, which Michelangelo never finished. They are in the grand hall as you approach the David. The figures seem to be rising from the blocks of marble with the rough chisel-marks designating something new.

As I thought about this, it told me three things:

First, that our work as humanitarians and conservationists is never finished.
Second, it is never too late to start something new and fix something old
And third, what you create can still bring something new that leaves its mark on others to carry on

What do you see when you look at great art?
***
Sincerely,
Ed
________________________

References...

Moral of story:

With a vision, your work in always one in process

Discussion Questions:

1) What great art, music, painting, sculpture, poetry, makes you imagine what can be?
2) If you see a photo of the Michelangelo's unfinished work, can you imagine what the finished sculpture would have looked like?
3) What does this do for your vision of what can be in your organization?
4) Can and will you aspire to great work?

For Further Reading:





© Copyright 2005, 2017, E. G. Happ, All Rights Reserved.


Sehnsucht
ˈzeɪnzuːxt,German ˈzeːnzʊxt/
noun literary
1. yearning; wistful longing. "a small enclave of adolescent Sehnsucht in her almost undeviatingly rational friend"